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JOHNNY CASH (Page 2 of 2)


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PLAY "FOLSOM PRISON BLUES" MIDI FILE (35 KB) IN BACKGROUND


JOINT RECORDING SESSIONS:

JOHNNY CASH:
Another unpleasant experience for Bob and me both was when the tape of the sessions he and I did together got out and was bootlegged all over Europe.

We did 16 or 17 songs, but we were just in there having fun. It was like what they call the Million Dollar Quartet, when I was singing with Elvis and Carl [Perkins] and Jerry Lee [Lewis].

The songs had no starting place and no stopping; we'd get into them and everyone would join in.

Bob and I did "Careless Love," whatever we might know the words to.... There's a song or two that's good enough to put out, but there's not an album there...

Bill Flanagan, Brief Encounter with Johnny Cash, The Telegraph No. 30, Summer 1988, p. 78

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DYLAN'S NASHVILLE SESSIONS

JOHNNY CASH:
Bob and Sara and the children stayed at my house while he was doin' that album, and he asked me to be guest on it -- well, as it turned out we were in the studio and just... they turned on the recorders for about two hours...

Unfinished Dylan letter to Johnny Cash and June Carter
collected by A. J. Weberman (Dylan Liberation Front) from Dylan's garbage
"liberated" from Weberman's homepage in 1997
(since you can't claim copyright for scans of stolen garbage -- this is Public Domain).

BOB JOHNSTON:
We set up some microphones and stools and they came in there and met each other [CHUCKLES], and went out there and started playing!

JOHNNY CASH:
One that came out of that session was "Girl from the North Country" -- was a guest song on Bob Dylan's album. Bob Dylan's appearance brought a great deal of attention to Nashville, a lot of attention that a lot of my peers did not give him credit for, but still he brought a lot of attention on Nashville -- people like him and people to follow who recorded songs in Nashville because Bob Dylan had...

BOB JOHNSTON:
And when he came to Nashville, he came -- and it was history coming. Why the hell was Dylan in Nashville? Blonde on Blonde combined Memphis and combined the Southern boys and combined a whole lot of things that... roots of the actual people, that's what was happening!

John Wesley Harding, in the middle of Rock'n'Roll,was *three* people -- that's insane for business people or whatever...supposedly.

It wasn't insane evidently; I think that Dylan is the one that broke the door down to Tin Pan Alley and I think he's the one that opened it up for Nashville. I think he should be given credit. I think for what he did with John Wesley Harding and Nashville Skyline that he should be in the Country Music Hall of Fame.

CHARLIE McCOY:
It's probably the one biggest thing that ever happened to Nashville -- as a recording center of all kinds of music. Because after he came here, it was like people... people in the rock music business all of a sudden said "Oh, wait a minute. Dylan went to Nashville, so it must be okay to go there."

ALL INTERVIEW QUOTES FROM "THE OTHER SIDE OF NASHVILLE" (DOCUMENTARY, 1983); transcribed by Manfred Helfert.


JOINT "SIGHTINGS"

JOHNNY CASH:
I think Bob Dylan was scared or even a little embarrassed. He's a very shy person. I can really appreciate that. When we went out to rehearse they had an old shack hanging from wires behind him to try to give it a backwoods look. He came offstage upset. He said, "I'm gonna be the laughing stock of the business! My fans are gonna laugh in my face over that thing!" I said, "What would you like?" He said, "Have 'em get that out of the way. Just put me out there myself." I said, alright, you got it.

Bill Flanagan, Brief Encounter with Johnny Cash, The Telegraph No. 30, Summer 1988, p. 78


LET'S HAVE A PARTY AT JOHNNY CASH'S (OR ALBERT'S) HOUSE

After the show, a relieved Dylan returns to Johnny Cash's house with famed bluegrass banjo player Earl Scruggs, Bob Johnston, and country songwriter Boudleaux Bryant for dinner. After dinner, they each perform a song, Dylan at his turn singing the old standard "These Working Hands." According to Graham Nash, who also recalls a dinner at Cash's, attended by, among others, himself, his then-girlfriend Joni Mitchell, Kris Kristofferson, and Eddy Arnold, Dylan sang four or five songs. Presumably it was the very same dinner. Nash recalls Sara sitting there crying at the drama of the moment.

Clinton Heylin, A Life in Stolen Moments, New York, 1996, p. 117.

JOHNNY CASH:
June and I went up to Woodstock to visit him once, too. I remember some of that: Rambling Jack Elliott, that fine and loving gentleman, driving us up from New York; Albert Grossman, Bob's manager, putting us up at his house, where the food was great, the spirit free, and the hours flexible; Bob and I, and whoever else was around, indulging ourselves in lots of guitar picking and song trading. There's nothing on earth I like better than song trading with a friend or a circle of them, except perhaps doing it with my family. As Bruce Springsteen wrote, "Nothing feels better than blood on blood."

Johnny Cash (with Patrick Carr), Cash: The Autobiography, San Francisco, CA, 1996, p. 198.


DYLAN SONGS COVERED BY JOHNNY CASH:


JOHNNY CASH SONG HEAVILY INFLUENCED BY DYLAN SONG
(or derived from the same Paul Clayton source?)

Listed as No. 4 of "The Ten Worst Dylanesque Songwriting Ripoffs," in Jimmy Guterman & Owen O'Donnell, The Worst Rock n' Roll Records of All Time, New York, 1991, p. 97.


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