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    "HEY, HEY, WOODY GUTHRIE,
    I WROTE YOU A SONG...
    .."

    Talking New York
    influenced by Guthrie's
    Talking Subway (as recorded by John Greenway)


    Just a note about Dylan's songwriting ability: Barry Hansen [aka "DR. DEMENTO"], our blues reviewer and an excellent judge of folk songs and folk singers, heard Dylan singing "Talking New York" in concert recently and described it to us as a new Guthrie song he hadn't before heard. The fact that Dylan's songs ring absolutely true, without a false note, as being nearly equal to those of one of the greatest folk song writers our country ever knew attests to Dylan's terrific skills.

    Jon Pankake & Paul Nelson, Bob Dylan, Little Sandy Review, c. 1962; reprinted in Elizabeth Thomson & David Gutman, The Dylan Companion, London, 1990, p. 61.



    Song To Woody
    tune taken from Woody's
    1913 Massacre.


    BOB DYLAN: It was written in the 1960th winter... in New York City, in the drug store on 8th street. It was one of them freezing days that I came back from Sid and Bob Gleason's in East Orange, New Jersey... Woody was there that day and it was a February Sunday night... And I just thought about Woody, I wondered about him, thought harder and wondered harder... I wrote this song in five minutes... It's all I got to say... If you don't know anything about Woody, then find out.

    Miles, Bob Dylan, Big O Publishing Ltd, 1978, p. 6.


    Last Thoughts On Woody Guthrie


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    WOODY GUTHRIE


    Any copyrighted material on these pages is used in "fair use", for the purpose of study, review or critical analysis only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s).
    Audio files are DELIBERATELY encoded "low-fi" to enable faster streaming and are intended as "illustrations" and "appetizers" only.
    Official and "hi-fi" recordings can (and should) be purchased at your local record dealer or through a number of web-based companies, like CDNow.



    SEARCH AMAZON.COM FOR "BOOKS, MUSIC & MORE" ON OR BY BOB DYLAN & WOODY GUTHRIE

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    After Leadbelly, names like Woodrow Wilson ("Woody") Guthrie and William L.C. ("Big Bill") Broonzy are the ones to drop in folksville. Both were drifters who wrote songs, sang them, made no money, and tended the flame. Guthrie, 50, who has been terribly ill with a nervous disease for the past eight years and is now at Kings County Hospital in Brooklyn, is an Oklahoman who never held a job more than a week or so, always needed a shave, and sang for anybody who cared to listen--timber workers on the edge of the Great Lakes, sharecroppers in the South. Today's young folk singers show a widespread predilection for Woody Guthrie songs, especially Hard Travelin' and This Land is Your Land...

    The tradition of Broonzy and Guthrie is being carried on by a large number of disciples, most notably a promising young hobo named Bob Dylan. He is 21 and comes from Duluth. He dresses in sheepskin and a black corduroy Huck Finn cap, which covers only a small part of his long, tumbling hair. He makes visits to Woody Guthrie's hospital bed, and he delivers his songs in a studied nasal that has just the right clothespin-on-the-nose honesty to appeal to those who most deeply care. His most celebrated song is Talkin' New York, about his first visit to the city, during the cold winter of 1961, when he discovered "Green Witch Village.

    TIME, Nov 23, 1963.


    SOME OF WOODY GUTHRIE'S SONGS
    COVERED BY BOB DYLAN:

    Minnesota Party Tape, late 1960:


    East Orange Tape, Feb-Mar 1961:


    Indian Neck Folk Festival, May 6, 1961:


    Minnesota Party Tape, May 1961:

    • This Land Is Your Land
    • Howdido (How Doo Do)
    • Car, Car (Riding In My Car)
    • Don't You Push Me Down
    • Come See
    • I Want It Now (I Want My Milk)
    • (As I Go) Ramblin' 'Round
    • Talking Fish Blues
    • Pastures of Plenty

    1st Gaslight Tape, Sep 6, 1961:


    Gerde's Folk City, Sep 1961:


    Carnegie Chapter Hall, Nov 4, 1961:


    1st McKenzie's Tape, late 1961:


    Minnesota Hotel Tape, Dec 22, 1961:


    Woody Guthrie Memorial Concert, Carnegie Hall, New York, NY, Jan 20, 1968 ("A Tribute to Woody Guthrie"):

    TOM PAXTON:
    He did "Mrs. Roosevelt" -- he did "Grand Coulee Dam" -- and, I forget what else. It was actually his first appearance since the accident... I didn't have a clue what it was going to sound like... I thought it was fabulous. I was shocked, but not in a bad way. I just never knew that Woody Guthrie songs could sound like that.

    Chuck Hirsch, Tom Paxton on Dylan -- an interview, "Zimmerman Blues", No. 7, Fall 1977


    Other End, New York, NY, Jul 3, 1975:


    Rolling Thunder Revue Tour I, 1975:


    Rolling Thunder Revue Tour II, 1976:


    "FOLKWAYS: A Vision Shared
    (A Tribute to Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly)"
    , 1988:


    NOTE: SOME OF WOODY'S TALKING BLUES SEEM TO HAVE BEEN PICKED UP INDIRECTLY FROM JOHN GREENWAY'S FOLKWAYS "TALKING BLUES" ALBUM OR VIA RAMBLIN' JACK ELLIOTT.



    MY FAVORITE WOODY GUTHRIE TRIBUTE ALBUM...

    Recorded with a bunch of "Nashville cats": GRADY MARTIN, dobro, sitar, guitar; RAY EDENTON, guitar; NORBERT PUTNAM, bass; HAL RUGG, guitar; HARGUS "PIG" ROBBINS, piano; BUDDY HARMON, drums.
    One minor (?) grudge: The CD clocks in at only 33:06 minutes.