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PETER LAFARGE


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BUFFY SAINTE-MARIE:
Peter LaFarge wrote "The Ballad of Ira Hayes," which was a very important song about Indian life. His father, Oliver, was a well-known Indian scholar...

Robbie Woliver, Hoot! A 25-Year History of the Greenwich Village Music Scene, St. Martin's Press, 1986, p. 105.


DYLAN COVER OF PETER LAFARGE SONG

MOSES "MOE" ASCH:
Peter La Farge comes from Fountain Colorado, where he was raised as a cowboy on the Kane Ranch. His second home is Santa Fe New Mexico, where his father Oliver La Farge resides. The thirty two year old folk musician... was adopted... by the Tewa Tribe of the Hopi nation... Peter left school when he was sixteen, to sing and rodeo... In 1946 Josh White came through Pete's country, and stopped off to work with him. Much work with Josh, Big Bill Broonzy and a close friendship with Cisco Houston followed with the years...

LINER NOTES FOR "AS LONG AS THE GRASS SHALL GROW," FOLKWAYS FN 2532, 1962, reissued 1964.

On Oct 27, 1964, Peter LaFarge died of a stroke (official version; rumors of him committing suicide persist):

In 1965 [sic] another Broadside songwriter "committed suicide." He was Peter La Farge, adopted son of Oliver La Farge, first winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Literature -- the book was "Laughing Boy," a sympathetic treatment of the Navajo Indians. The F.B.I. took an interest in Peter and began hounding him when he organized FAIR (Federation for American Indian Rights). Several months before he died, the F.B.I. raided his New York apartment at midnight. They scattered and tore up his papers; they put handcuffs on him and dragged him to Bellevue in his pajamas [sic]. They put pressure on Bellevue to declare him insane, but Bellevue could find nothing wrong and turned him loose.

Gordon Friesen, Broadside No. 133, Oct-Dec 1976, reprinted in Erwin Otto, "Das 'Topical Song Magazine' Broadside -- Ein Forum des Protests", in: Hans-Juergen Diller (editor), American Popular Culture, Anglistik & Englischunterricht, Heidelberg, 1985, p. 106.


PETER LaFARGE DISCOGRAPHY


PETER LAFARGE -- DYLAN'S... "BABY-SITTER"???

CAMILLA ADAMS HORNE:
He [Bob Dylan] was hanging around with a pretty blatantly pot-smoking crowd... I was concerned. I figured this crowd was due for a raid because it was too well known, and I kept nagging at him, and he kept saying he'd given it up.

SID GLEASON:
So I asked Peter LaFarge to keep an eye on him, and he did... Pete would walk into a party where Bob was and stand with his arms crossed, not saying a word, just watching. And Bobby called me one day and said, "Mom, please get that Indian off my back. I promise I won't do anything like that again." Every place he was, Pete would come and show up. Bobby knew that his Mom was after him.

(quoted by ANTHONY SCADUTO, BOB DYLAN, London, 1973, p. 64.)


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